supply chain management

7 Easy Steps to Set Up Your Supply Chain Correctly

Learn how to set up your supply chain and manage your inventory correctly from the start

Supply chain is incredibly daunting, especially if you’re new to it. While it might seem confusing and complicated at first, you can tackle this complex field by breaking it down into a series of simple steps. 

1.       Choose Your Inventory Assortment

This is where your genius as a founder comes in. You know your customers best and you can use your judgement and qualitative insights to hone in on that next best thing. Of course, if there’s any data you can use to supplement your intuition (like what’s sold well in the past), we encourage you to do so!

We always recommend that young companies start with a simple assortment of SKUs. You can always add more as you grow, but it’s incredibly hard to manage a wide product assortment right out of the gate.

2.       Forecast Demand

This step is critical because you need to have an understanding of what sales of each product (down to the size and color level) will be. Without this analysis, you could wind up vastly over or under buying inventory. When you’re just starting out, it’s completely OK to use an Excel model. Hopefully, you’ve taken our advice and kept your product assortment simple, which will make it easier for you to forecast demand.

However, as you scale, there aren’t really any sophisticated tools out there to help you that don’t cost a small fortune. That’s why we created Fuse - to help algorithmically forecast demand at a price point that doesn’t break the bank.

3.       Size Your Inventory Buys

Once you’ve completed your demand forecast, you need to translate this data into an inventory buy and replenishment plan to make sure that you have enough inventory to fulfill expected demand. As a young company, you can’t afford to stock out - it disappoints customers and damages your brand.

To avoid stockouts, you want to link your demand forecast to the inventory you have on hand and the inventory you expect to receive from suppliers in the coming months. You need to order enough to make up for the gap between what you have on hand, what you expect to receive and how much you plan to sell. You’ll also need a bit of buffer just in case.

Many companies do this work in Excel, but Fuse can automate the whole process of translating your forecast to an order recommendation that’s consistent with your buying cycle.

4.       Track Your Purchase Orders

Now that you’ve placed your orders with your suppliers, you’ll need some sort of tracking system to track these POs. If there are delays or something arrives to the factory damaged, you’ll want to make sure to stay on top of it or else you may stock out.

Many companies use Google Sheets, but with Fuse’s PO module, Fuse has a simple way for you to seamlessly track your purchase orders. Unlike a google sheet, once the PO change is logged, we can seamlessly link it back to your current inventory position and demand forecast in order to give you a clear picture of what this means for your business.

5.       Track Your Inventory

Now you know that your inventory is somewhere between your supplier and your warehouse, but the question is, where? Is it on the boat, is it at the dock, is it in the warehouse? Flexport can help you track where your goods are. This type of tracking is critical because there may be delays at customs or in other parts of that shipping process that neither you nor your vendor can anticipate. Having visibility can help you make adjustments and communicate with your customers.

6.       Understand Your Inventory Position

Your inventory has arrived. Now, it’s critical to understand exactly how much of it you have and where it is. There are two possibilities - you can do it yourself at your own warehouse or you can work with a third party logistics provider (3PL). Most young companies choose to work with a 3PL rather than managing their own warehouse. With a 3PL provider like Quiet Logistics, you can completely outsource both the tracking and fulfillment piece of inventory management. While this might seem expensive, unless your core competency as a business or a founder is warehouse management, you may be better off outsourcing.

If you do choose to run and manage your own warehouse, you’ll need a warehouse management system like Fishbowl to help your employees in the warehouse know what’s where and also track goods as they come in. 

7.       Fulfill Your Orders

Finally, your products are in your warehouse and you’re ready to get products into the hands of customers. This is one of the most critical questions in the supply chain. There are two parts to this process - order management part and shipping and logistics.

On the order management side, there are many great systems out there like Stitch Labs that can help you make sure you’ve allocated the right amount of inventory to your e-commerce site, your retail store and your wholesale business. When you process an order from a customer on your website, you want to make sure that you have enough inventory to fulfill that order. You might have a lot of inventory on hand, but perhaps all of it is already allocated to your wholesale channel. These systems can also notify you when you’re running low. As your company grows, you may want to expand into more robust ERP systems like NetSuite. These types of systems are typically what people think of when they refer to an “inventory management system.”

Finally, the shipping and logistics piece is a whole separate beast. Smaller companies aren’t well resourced to do this, which is why a 3PL system can be extremely useful. Not only can they take care of your inbound goods, but they can also pack and ship goods to your customers. There are also new software providers like Shiphawk that can help you and your customers track where the shipment is. This piece is critically important because it’s how your customers will interact with you and your brand, so you want the experience - from packaging, to shipping, to tracking, to delivery - to be flawless. 

Staying sane

As a growing company, to stay sane, you need to take it one step at a time. There are some basic things you can do when you’re starting out to make life easier and help you succeed. First, find a 3PL provider you trust and rely on them to do the blocking and tackling. Second, while going into wholesale can seem attractive, you need to be careful about doing this early on. Working with retailers that are 1000x your size can be extremely challenging and time consuming, so you want to make sure to pick the right partner. Lastly, be thoughtful about how much inventory you buy and how you finance it. Making big mistakes early on can literally take down your company. 

We created Fuse to help companies transition from managing their demand forecasting and inventory planning process in Excel and Google Sheets to using sophisticated software. Start with Excel, but don’t stay there too long. As your business becomes more complex, mistakes become even more risky and costly. Make sure to invest in inventory planning software like Fuse to avoid drastically over or understocking. We’re here to help you focus on your business, not your inventory.

7 Supply Chain Definitions Every Founder Should Know

Closet full of colorful clothes

We work with many young companies started by inspiring founders who often have incredible marketing and branding chops. But, when it comes to inventory, that expertise is hard to hone and hire for. Even if you’re not an expert, there are things you can do like follow our 7 step guide and get familiar with a few basic definitions: 

1. Lead Time 

This is the most basic concept on the list and probably something you’ve already heard from your suppliers. Lead time is simply the number of weeks or months between when an order is placed with a supplier and when the finished good can be delivered. Your fully baked lead time will be not only how long it takes your supplier to make your product, but also how long it will take them to ship it to you. 

2. Minimum Order Quantities (MOQus)

If you’re a small brand, you’ve probably already run into this concept with your suppliers. Minimum order quantity is the minimum quantity in units per SKU, units per category or dollars that your supplier will allow you to order. Although you might do a lot of sophisticated analysis to figure out the exact amount of inventory that you need, it might not matter if this amount is below the minimum order quantity defined by your supplier. While it might not be possible, you should definitely try to negotiate the MOQu down to give you flexibility and avoid holding more inventory than you need or can sell.

3. Buffer Stock (Safety Stock) and Service Level 

No matter how accurately you are, there is always risk that you may have underestimated the inventory you need. To avoid stockouts, companies keep extra stock on hand by setting a service level target which is the probability that all customer orders will be fulfilled. New brands might want to set a high (99%) so as not to damage the brand with stockouts. But, service level does rely on relatively predictable demand which many young brands don’t have. That’s why at Fuse, we rely on a weeks of supply target. 

4. Weeks-of-Supply

Weeks-of-supply is calculated as total inventory / weekly sales. Weeks of supply can be calculated based on historical results or as a forward looking metric based on your forecast. Many inventory professionals consider the forward looking approach to be best practice because seasonality can vary drastically throughout the year. In Fuse, we seamlessly calculate your weeks of supply target and build it into your inventory buffer. We’ll look to your expected seasonality and make sure that you’re always ordering enough for next season.

5. Sell-Through Rate 

Weeks of supply and sell-through, when used together, can help give you a complete picture of your inventory position. Sell-through is defined as total sales divided by inventory stock at the beginning of the period. So, if you sold 500 silk blouses in January but started with 1,000 silk blouses in inventory, your sell-through rate would be 50%. A high sell-through rate and a low weeks of supply number means that you need to restock while a low sell-through rate (5%) and a high weeks of supply number means that you’ve overbought and may need to mark down your inventory. One of the most relied upon concepts in inventory planning, sell through can give you a good benchmark for understanding the health of your inventory. 

6. Reorder Point and Reorder Level

The reorder point is the level of inventory at which a reorder is triggered. This point is calculated as the forecast sales during the lead time plus buffer stock. The reorder point tells you when you need to reorder, but not necessarily how much (the reorder level). Fuse can help you understand both metrics by seamlessly linking the pieces together. We provide a reorder recommendation based on the buffer you set, your lead time and the demand forecast you’ve created using our advanced algorithms.

7. Open to Buy 

An open to buy puts all of the concepts of inventory planning together in one report. It is a budget that highlights how much capital is available to spend in a given period, and how much already has open POs against it. In many instances, a planner may know exactly how much product she needs to order to support demand, but she may no longer have the budget to meet this demand. For example, she might need $150,000 of product next month to reach the brand’s sales targets, but $75,000 may already be allocated to open POs. In this type of example, the planner’s job is to optimize the allocation of the remaining budget to best serve the business. Usually, at this point, the best course of action is to determine how best to optimize margin. The planner will evaluate which SKUs can generate the most profit given the limited budget available rather than simply doubling down on best sellers.

At Fuse, we’ve implemented these concepts and best practices in our software to vastly simplify the analyses that planners have to do. We’re here to help you focus on your business, not your inventory.

Sources: 
https://www.thebalance.com/sell-through-rate-2890389
http://www.threebuckets.com/category/formula-cheat-sheet/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Service_level
https://www.thebalance.com/open-to-buy-planning-2890318
http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/lead-time.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reorder_point
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/minimum-order-quantity

Are You Financing Your Inventory the Wrong Way? Here are 3 Ways to do it Right.

Make sure to finance your inventory the right way!

Over the past year, we’ve learned that many young companies are financing their inventory completely the wrong way. What’s the wrong way to finance inventory? With venture capital funding. 

Why you don’t need VC funding for your brand

First and foremost, unless you have a completely new business model (like Dollar Shave Club or Birchbox when they were first starting out) or something else that’s extremely innovative about the brand you’re building, venture capital funding is probably not right for you. If you do take VC funding, it should be used exclusively to drive your business’ hiring and marketing needs. These are important investments in growth and worth selling a piece of your company for. But, given that there are many other ways to finance your inventory, selling a big chunk of your company to do so doesn’t make any sense. 

At this point, you might be asking yourself, well if I can’t use venture funding, what should I do? Here are three options:

(1) Your Suppliers and Manufacturers

Our advisor, Lisa Hom, who’s starting a new brand called Kaleido Concepts and has been an executive at multiple $100 mm+ brands, plans to finance her inventory by, “...getting creative when working with manufactures and suppliers. It all comes down to cash flow. The strategy should be to pay your manufacturers for the goods after you sell them. I asked a manufacturer for terms of net 120 days, meaning that I didn't have to pay him for the goods until 120 days after he shipped the product.  So it gave me 90 days to sell it and not have to pay for the goods out of my cash.”

While it may take a bit of leverage to get that type of accommodation from a supplier, most founders don’t even know that they can ask. Many manufacturers feel that they are falling behind and are eager to partner with founders who can educate them on the world of e-commerce. When starting a new brand, you need to talk to suppliers from a place of strength, so getting creative about what your strengths are is super valuable. Moreover, we’ve seen several start-ups partner with their supplier by letting them take an equity stake in the company. Not only does it give you capital, but it also completely aligns your incentives.

(2) A Letter of Credit

Now that you’re in business and actually have sales, you can go get a letter of credit from a bank. The letter of credit will demonstrate to your suppliers that you will be able to pay them. This letter of credit not only allows you to purchase more inventory than you otherwise could, but it also allows you to negotiate better payment terms with your suppliers. Now that you have more inventory, you can drive higher sales, increase the amount guaranteed by the bank, buy even more inventory and do it all over again. So long as the inventory is selling, you’ll continue to be able to use this approach to finance your business.

(3) Inventory Factoring

Finally, although inventory factoring sometimes gets a bad name, there are great companies like Dwight Funding, who are revolutionizing the world of inventory factoring and taking a modern approach to working with young companies. Inventory factoring is when a company takes on debt to finance inventory against its future sales or accounts receivable. This can be especially effective when you work with large retailers like Sephora, Nordstrom and others that commit to purchasing large amounts of product for the upcoming season well in advance. These receivables can be leveraged to get a loan in order to be able to buy the inventory that will support these large contracts. 

What do you need to be successful?

If you pursue these strategies, you need to maintain trust with the third parties you work with by forecasting your demand and inventory needs accurately. If you’re unable to pay your supplier because you’ve vastly overestimated the sellthru rate of your inventory or your factoring partner can’t get a straight answer on what you expect this year, these partnerships won’t be successful. That’s where a tool like Fuse comes in to help you forecast demand and inventory more accurately. Planning inventory and getting it right is our bread and butter. As a scrappy start-up, our tool can help you gain leverage and continue to forecast easily and accurately as you grow your SKU count and monthly order volume without throwing more bodies at the problem. No matter how you choose to finance your inventory, Fuse is here to help you focus on your business, not your inventory.
 

What is an Inventory Planner and why is she SO important to your growing brand?

An inventory planner hard at work optimizing the supply chain of a growing brand

Are you an Inventory Planner? Have you ever tried to explain to your friends or coworkers what you do and had a hard time getting them to really get it?

Are you a business owner building a brand who’s been told that you should hire a planner? Have you wondered to yourself, ‘why?’ and ‘what would she help me with?’

If you fall into either of these two buckets, this post is for you! If you’re an underappreciated planner, we hope you can send this to your friends and coworkers so that they truly understand how much you contribute to your company. If you’re a business owner who’s new to ops but wants to scale, we hope we can persuade you to get an inventory planner before you run into a major operational crisis like stocking out of your top selling SKUs.

First, let’s start with some basic definitions. Inventory planners help companies:

(1) Determine how much inventory they need to order. 

Just like Goldilocks, growing businesses need just the right amount of inventory to survive. Order too little and you risk stocking out, damaging your credibility with your customers and harming your brand. Order too much and you can wind up with hundreds of thousands or even millions of dollars of wasted inventory. The capital you invested may be permanently lost, crippling you from investing in other critical business initiatives like products that are selling well or marketing to attract new customers. Inventory planners do a complex optimization exercise every year, quarter, month and even week to make sure that just the right amount of inventory across all products has been ordered.

(2) Determine when the inventory needs to arrive.

It’s not enough to simply order enough inventory, but the inventory planner’s role is also to make sure that it arrives when it’s needed. If a company has a three month lead time, discovering that more inventory is needed the week before isn’t helpful. Conversely, if the inventory will sell through eventually but is just sitting in the company’s warehouse for six months, that capital could certainly have been put to better use. Timing is a critical piece of the planning equation.

(3) Aligning with sales and marketing. 

Marketing and sales are always trying to drive business. A critical input into planning are questions like “what promos are we running this month?” and “what big wholesale accounts do we expect to win next year?” Inventory planners work closely with marketing and sales to make sure that there is the right amount of product to support and prepare for the big wins expected to come from these initiatives. In prior blog posts, we’ve highlighted the importance of coordinating with operations if you’re in sales or marketing. 

So, why are Inventory Planners important?

Well, we hope that after reading our definitions, the picture all starts to come together. Yet, the unfortunate reality remains that inventory planning remains one of the most misunderstood and least appreciated functions at growing brands. 

So, here’s what we think. Inventory is either the #1 or #2 investment that companies make. If it’s #2, it’s second only to marketing. An investment this big, if not managed properly, can and has been the cause of failure. The less capital you have to play with, the more important it is to optimize that investment. While there is a lot to be done downstream in the supply chain, and we’ve highlighted this in our post on 7 supply chain questions you need to answer, the best optimization on the fulfilment side can’t help you if you’ve ordered the wrong amount of inventory. Because of this, the person who plans your inventory - makes sure you’re investing enough and makes sure it’s coming in on time - is one of the most important people in your company and one of the earliest roles all consumer brands should hire for early on. 

Whether you’re an inventory planner with decades of experience or a start-up founder who’s just coming to grips with the importance of operations and inventory, Fuse is here to help you focus on your business, not your inventory.

What's our ROI?

When we first started Fuse, we had several key hypotheses as to how we could improve the way inventory planning is done by retailers today. First, we were convinced that it’s impossible to plan a growing business in Excel. As the volume of data and the number of SKUs grow, it’s easy to make errors in Excel and, in fact, impossible not to when you’ve linked several spreadsheets and Excel is crashing mid-save. Excel’s capabilities are limited, and thus planners must rely on backward-looking metrics like sell-thru and historical growth rates, which don’t accurately paint a picture of their growing business. Second, an algorithm can better detect anomalies and accurately estimate seasonality than a human whose attention is divided amongst the many other urgent priorities of the day.

After working with our early customers for some time, we’re proud to say that both our hypotheses were correct -- we’ve found that the ROI of using Fuse makes a meaningful, material difference on both the revenue and the cost side.

10% More Revenue

On the revenue side, we’ve found that Fuse helps our customers achieve 10% more revenue. We did a deep dive into our customers’ biggest quarter - Q4. First, we took a look at stockouts in Q4. We defined a stockout as zero sales with 95% confidence. This means that we excluded instances in which zero sales could have legitimately meant no demand for the product. Second, we assumed that our customer’s revenue target for Q4 was equal to actual Q4 sales. In reality, given the number of stock-outs our customers experienced (more on that below), the revenue target was likely most definitely higher than the sales figures actually achieved. Finally, at Fuse, we always encourage our customers to modify the forecast by including relevant details like product launch dates, products that are phasing out, as well as other information they might know about their business that an algorithm doesn’t. For purposes of our analysis, however, we excluded that information. 

Even assuming the above simplifications, we found that our customers could have made 10% more revenue and avoided 450 stock-outs (on average) during Q4 if they’d followed Fuse’s algorithm. In fact, one of our earliest customers who joined the platform in Q4 had zero stock-outs in Q1

What does this mean? Well, for one thing, it means that Excel is definitely not the right tool for growing businesses to plan inventory. In addition, it also means that even without additional input from our customers, Fuse’s initial predictions (based on seasonality) can achieve dramatically better results for our customers.

Reduce Overspend on Inventory by 3x

What we often find with the growing companies we work with is that a significant stock-out in the past, or paranoia about stocking out, leads to panic overbuying. This ties up precious capital and resources in inventory that could be deployed elsewhere. 

In Fuse, we use a forward-looking weeks of supply target to help customers maintain a lean inventory buffer. We often find that many of our customers are managing their buffer using sell-thru (which is backwards looking) or a historical weeks of supply target. For a growing business, these backward looking metrics don’t reflect current trends, and can lead to dangerous overbuying. However, with Fuse, it’s now possible to look forwards instead of backwards, thanks to our accurate forecast and real-time actualization of sales.

We took our customer’s forward-looking weeks of supply target (based on Fuse’s forecast) and applied it to create a recommended inventory buy and replenishment recommendation. What we found was that on average, our customers were overstocked in almost 200 products and spending 3x what they needed to on inventory. By following Fuse’s recommendations, our customers can dramatically reduce their inventory spend and more efficiently manage their working capital, freeing up cash for initiatives that will grow their business, like customer acquisition.

Conclusion

Our data shows that prior to Fuse, our customers were buying not enough of the right SKUs and too much of the wrong SKUs. With Fuse, our customers can switch this around and invest more capital on the right SKUs and less on the wrong SKUs. At Fuse, we’re here to help you focus on your business, not your inventory. 

5 reasons you need a physical store and how to hack it if you can't afford one

Physical retail stores are still important in an e-commerce world

It seems like everywhere these days all you read about is doom and gloom for physical retail. Same store sales are declining, foot traffic is decreasing and brick and mortar is struggling as Amazon continues to take over the world. While we can’t deny the facts, we do think that there is a compelling case for new brands to create some sort of physical presence:

(1) It’s hard to be a big business without a physical presence

As evidenced by the recent troubles at JackThreads and Nasty Gal, e-commerce pure plays are very vulnerable. While each of these companies had their own unique problems, the attractiveness of the e-commerce model can only take a company so far. Compare JackThreads and Nasty Gal to Bonobos and Warby Parker. The latter two are both e-commerce darlings which have started focusing on creating physical showrooms. These showrooms don’t hold inventory, but they create a physical presence where customers can come in and experience the product. Warby Parker understood the importance of the physical experience from the beginning and created its home try-on program as a way to compensate for a lack of physical stores. JackThreads attempted to create a try-on program, but it was ultimately too little too late. Of course, there are some shining examples of success like Dollar Shave Club, but so far, these are the exception and not the rule.

(2) Most shopping is still done in person

We all know the stats. E-commerce is growing rapidly at a rate of 15-17% year over year. Yet, despite this incredible growth, e-commerce (excluding big ticket items like cars), still only represents 10% of retail sales. Of course, this is huge compared to just a few years ago and the growth rates speak for themselves. That being said, as a brand, you want to be where your customers are and at least 90% of their dollars are currently spent in store. It’s important to maintain your e-commerce business and prioritize it as the wave of the future, but completely ignoring the channel in which customers currently spend most of their dollars just isn’t smart business.

(3) As consumers shift spend from goods to experiences, a store can be a great way to create a compelling experience with your brand

If you think about some of the most successful retailers in the world, like Apple, the thing that makes them so successful is that the store is a unique experience that helps the customer connect with the brand. When you walk into Apple, you might not necessarily be looking to buy, but you certainly are looking to explore and discover new things.

Physical stores, by creating a branded experience, can have a similar impact for your business. They are a great place for customers to discover new products that they wouldn’t otherwise have seen or evaluate more expensive purchases, like jewelry. In many ways, the physical store can act like a marketing channel by putting your brand, products and the experience it stands for front and center with consumers.

(4) If you can’t afford your own stores or showrooms, take advantage of pop-ups

Several of our customers, including Aella, have been extremely successful with lower cost, temporary pop-up shops. The next one includes a partnership with several other brands and starts on March 1st. While pop-up shops are of course, temporary, they still create tremendous brand awareness in critical markets. The goal of these stores is ultimately to drive e-commerce traffic, so by being strategic about the location and timing, you can achieve that objective without committing to a full fledged store. 

Pop ups are great because in expensive markets like NYC, there are plenty of landlords who are receptive to the concept. Their rent is high, so finding a long-term tenant can be difficult. Thus, this leaves plenty of open space for your pop-up. 

(5) Being strategic about wholesale can have a similar impact as having your own showroom or pop up

Wholesale is a tough channel. Not only does it eat into margins, but it’s hard to control how your product is merchandised. That being said, picking a few strategic partners and specific locations that align with your brand can be tremendously helpful in reaching your ultimate objective: driving traffic back to your e-commerce site. 

However, the challenge really comes into play on the margin side. A lot of e-commerce companies have lower prices because they can - they can still have attractive margins by disintermediating the middle man. Many e-commerce companies pride themselves on replicating the Warby Parker model - finding inefficiencies in the supply chain which allow them to have lower prices than more established competitors. However, before setting your prices, brands need to keep in mind that price is an important indicator of quality to consumers. Further, if you want to maintain the flexibility to enter the wholesale channel, having slightly higher prices will create a bit of cushion for you on the margin side.

At Fuse, we're dedicated to supporting your business, whether it's an e-commerce pure play or a combination of e-commerce, retail and wholesale. We're here to help you focus on your business, not your inventory.

4 big inventory questions everyone is thinking about

Do you ever wonder, is anyone else thinking what I'm thinking?

Now that we’ve defined planning and provided some basic definitions to start with, it’s time to dig into the more difficult questions. We recently ran a product survey to ask our customers what questions were most important to you and have picked these four topics to expand on based on the results:

Data Anomalies

Data anomalies or outliers are non-recurring events like on-off promotions, PR pieces or stock-outs that may have impacted your sales history. Based on the results of our survey, this was by far and away the biggest concern for the majority of our customers with 40% of respondents citing this issue as their primary focus. 

The underlying reason for this is that data anomalies often go unnoticed in Excel spreadsheets, and when they are identified, their “weird” appearance relies on human memory to go back and analyze what happened. Was the dip in sales the result of a stock-out or poor performance? Was the spike in sales a result of a marketing promotion, or was it related to regular seasonality. Often, if the anomalies are identified, it requires a lot of digging through old emails to figure out exactly what happened in the data.

Fuse helps automate this process by scanning all of your data for anomalies (like big sales spikes or dips) so that none of these events go unaccounted for. Once we’ve identified anomalies, we smooth them out to create a more seamless forecast.

Marketing Data

We’ve written several times about the importance of making sure that marketing is closely aligned with the inventory planning team. Marketing directly impacts customer acquisition and revenue which in turn dictates the appropriate investment in inventory. 

In addition to ongoing marketing spend, promotions are important one-off events to note because they can drive significant spikes in demand, which, if not appropriately noted, can be confused with run of the mill seasonality. A big obstacle to noting these types of events is often a lack of information sharing between marketing and operations. While the marketing calendar might give marketing visibility, it’s sometimes not shared with or not checked by operations. In Fuse, you’ll soon be able to note marketing events like promos proactively in order to take these important initiatives into account in your forecast.

Cannibalization

Cannibalization is defined as the negative impact of a new product on the sales of existing products. While this is a concern for companies of all sizes, it can be particularly challenging for smaller companies that have a limited reach and audience. It can be unclear if launching a new product will expand the brand’s reach, encourage repeat purchasers or simply eat into existing products. Without sophisticated software, the cannibalization question can be hard to answer.

One simple starting point is attribute tagging which involves associating descriptive characteristics with each product. Attributes don’t have to be super complex - they can be things as basic as color. Although tedious to keep track of, if done properly, attribute tagging can allow the user compare how products with the same or similar attributes perform. More importantly, keeping a disciplined system of tags can help abstract away from the subjective elements of a product. 

Interestingly, at times, some of our customers have found that products that are seemingly in completely different categories cannibalize each other. However, when you take a closer look, there are often unexpected similarities on the underlying attribute level.

Procurement

Another big pain point (once the forecast is complete) is managing POs with suppliers so that the raw materials arrive in time for production. For any company that manufactures its own products, making sure that you don’t drop the ball on ordering all of the parts and components is critical. Between varying lead times, reliability, minimum order quantities and case pack sizes across suppliers, it can become a very painful and confusing optimization exercise. 

One way to mitigate the issues that can arise is to hire an industry veteran early on in your company’s history who has great relationships with the suppliers you need. As painful as this scheduling and optimization exercise can be, it’s even more painful if there are production disruptions caused by a company that’s much bigger than yours jumping ahead of you in line. The only real way to prevent this is to grow to become a bigger company (easier said than done), to have the right internal skills to diligence your suppliers appropriately or to have great relationships with your suppliers from prior experiences with them.

As we grow Fuse, we hope to be the primary resource that helps you solve these problems and more. We’re here to help you focus on your business, not your inventory.

7 supply chain questions you NEED to answer and the tools that can help

Seven supply chain questions critical to managing and planning inventory

Supply chain is a complex field, but we’ve taken a stab at simplifying it for you by breaking it down into a series of simple questions:

1. What assortment of inventory do I want?

There’s a vast array of products that you can offer your customers – a single product can come in one color or ten. Often times, this is a question of judgement based on what has sold well in the past, trends in the market, or consumer preferences.

Thankfully, tools are emerging to help companies gather data and make better decisions. Trendalytics is a company that helps centralize social media data, like what’s trending on Instagram, into actionable insights. Makersights helps businesses gain insights into what their customers are looking for. Companies can use this knowledge to make better decisions about their product mix.

Although you might be tempted to offer many products in every color of the rainbow, as a young company, it’s better to start with a few core products and colors and expand slowly.

2. How much inventory will I sell?

Once you’ve decided on your product mix, you need to make a demand forecast to determine what sales of each product will be. These analyses are quite granular, down to the color and size level.

Most companies start out using Excel, but they quickly outgrow it as their product assortment increases. Beyond Excel, there aren’t many sophisticated tools in a price range that young companies can afford.

We created Fuse to help answer this exact question as seamlessly as possible. We automate the majority of your forecast, and our sophisticated algorithms catch and smooth out outliers. You can always tweak our recommendations as needed.

3. How much inventory do I need to order?

Once your forecast is done, you need to translate the forecast into an order recommendation. For each SKU, you’ll want to examine three key inputs:

  • Your projected demand (based off of your forecast)
  • How much inventory you have on hand
  • How much inventory you expect to receive in the coming months

You want to make sure to order enough to make up for the gap between what you have on hand, what you expect to receive and how much you plan to sell. You’ll also need a bit of buffer in case your forecast isn’t 100% accurate.

Many companies do this work in Excel, but Fuse can automate the whole process of translating your forecast to an order recommendation that’s consistent with your buying cycle.

4. Where will I order my inventory?

Finally, you need to decide on the suppliers you’re going to use. Our post from a few weeks ago highlights key factors in making this decision.

Once you’ve placed your POs, you’ll need some sort of tracking system. Most companies use Google Sheets, but with the launch of our procurement module, Fuse now has a simple way for you to seamlessly track your purchase orders in our system.

5. Where is my inventory?

Now you know that your inventory is somewhere between your supplier and your warehouse, but the question is, where? Is it on the boat, is it at the dock, is it in the warehouse?This type of tracking is useful because there may be delays that neither you nor your vendor can anticipate, so having visibility can help you make adjustments and communicate with your customers.

6. How much inventory do I have?

Some companies choose to run and manage their own warehouse, in which case, you’ll need a warehouse management system like Fish Bowl to help your employees in the warehouse know what’s where and also mark goods as they come in. Once inventory is received, your warehouse manager can send you a weekly CSV so that you can close out open POs.

Other companies choose to outsource their warehouse completely to a 3PL provider like Quiet Logistics. Although this can seem like a more expensive option at first, having your own warehouse and hiring people to manage it is usually not cost efficient unless you reach massive scale.

7. How do I get my inventory to my customer?

This question can be broken down into two key parts. The order management piece and the shipping and logistics piece.

The order management side helps you manage multichannel selling (your e-commerce site, your retail store and your wholesale business). When you process an order from a customer on your website, you want to make sure that you have enough inventory to fulfill that order. You might have a lot of inventory on hand, but perhaps all of it is already allocated to your wholesale channel. Order management systems like Stitch Labs (for smaller companies) and Tradegecko (for larger companies) can help you stay organized. They can also notify you when you’re running low. As your company grows, you may want to expand into more robust ERP systems like NetSuite. These types of systems are typically what people think of when they refer to an “inventory management system.”

Finally, the shipping and logistics piece is a whole separate beast. Companies like Amazon have mastered what’s known as last mile fulfillment which allows them to deliver goods to the customer as quickly as possible. Smaller companies aren’t well resourced to do this, which is why a 3PL system can be extremely useful. Not only can they take care of your inbound goods, but they can also pack and ship goods to your customers.

Staying sane

Especially right after the hectic holiday season, supply chain can seem daunting. For growing companies, we’d recommend taking it one step at a time:

1. Find a 3PL provider you trust and rely on them to do the blocking and tackling.
2. Be thoughtful about multichannel selling. While wholesale orders provide a steady stream of revenue, they are much lower margin. Make sure you’re working with retailers who will enhance your brand and help your direct to consumer business gain traction.
3. Be thoughtful about your forecast and how much inventory you buy – making big mistakes early on in your supply chain will be the costly.

We created Fuse to help companies transition from managing their forecasting and ordering process in Excel and Google Sheets to using sophisticated software. We’re here to help you focus on your business, not your inventory.

How to revisit seasonality this holiday season

Young companies face many forecasting and supply chain challenges, including forecasting seasonality. The best way to forecast might be to instead focus on shortening your lead time.

Forecasting seasonality is tough for young companies

One of the key inputs into any demand forecast is seasonality. For mature businesses, seasonality trends are well established, but growing business have a notoriously hard time assessing seasonality. Although it’s widely known that many businesses experience a spike in sales during the holiday season, sizing that spike is extremely difficult when you’re just starting out. If your business is growing, the trend might be obscured entirely. What’s more, gaps in the data, like stock-outs, can make it even harder to understand last year’s trend.

So, how does one solve this extremely difficult problem? The bad news is that as a general rule, if your company has less than two years of sales data, it’s going to be extremely difficult. For this reason, Fuse’s inventory management system supplements young companies’ data with trends that we’re seeing in our portfolio. We also note anomalies in the data (like stock-outs) and smooth out the seasonality curve by excluding these outliers. This helps us create a normalized seasonality curve, even for very young companies.

Forecasting and lead times are two sides of the same coin

Another way to solve this problem is to start your business with a focus on crafting a supply chain advantage. Accurate forecasting and shorter lead times are two sides of the same coin. The shorter your lead time, the faster you can react to observed changes in consumer demand. You can order a small amount of product and then watch and learn. If you have a short lead time, you’ll be able to quickly restock SKUs that are running out based on your observations. On the other hand, the longer your lead time, the more accurate your forecast needs to be because you can’t react quickly.

These days, investors are often tempted to look at e-commerce companies as the “Warby Parker” of shoes, hats, scarves, you name it. But what’s often forgotten is that a big factor that led to Warby Parker’s success was streamlining the supply chain, building deep relationships with vendors and vertical integration. If your company depends on a supplier that has given you a three month lead time and might bump you back in the production cycle if an order from a bigger competitor comes in, it’s going to be much harder to be successful competing against the big guys.

Reducing inventory cost by outsourcing has hidden costs

Most growing e-commerce companies outsource to suppliers abroad to lower their costs, but there are many hidden costs to outsourcing, longer lead times being one of them. It is almost impossible to be responsive with an extended supply chain. You might think that shipping from 12 time zones away takes a couple of weeks, but you need to decide on your order quantities and assortment many weeks before the goods are produced and shipped.  

Suzanne deTreville, a professor in Operations Management, has spent her career researching procurement optimization and shared some of her key insights on the hidden costs of outsourcing your supply chain:

“Managers often have no idea how much it costs them to have to decide order quantities before they have any insight into what demand is going to be. A distant supplier that requires a decision about what to produce several months in advance might seem to represent an irresistible bargain in offering the product at 20% less than a local supplier. But, all of those apparent cost savings will be wiped out when it becomes clear that you’ve ordered the wrong products. Going with a local supplier allows the production decision to be postponed until the company has more visibility into demand. 

The value of having a nimble supply chain depends on several factors. Companies get into trouble when they make simplistic assumptions. We use models to determine the value of responsiveness and to create portfolios that maximize profit and keep more space for innovation. It is typical to lose 25% or more of sales due to mismanaging supply-chain costs, so these models can add a lot to the bottom line.”

Build a supply chain advantage by hiring the right team

In addition to using sophisticated inventory management software like Fuse, companies can also solve the supply chain problem by hiring the right experts early. While not every founder with a great idea will have pre-existing supplier relationships, bringing on folks who have these relationships and the corresponding expertise can make the critical difference between success or failure.

Regardless of where your company is in the supply chain optimization process, Fuse is here to help you focus on your business, not your inventory.