5 reasons you need a physical store and how to hack it if you can't afford one

Physical retail stores are still important in an e-commerce world

It seems like everywhere these days all you read about is doom and gloom for physical retail. Same store sales are declining, foot traffic is decreasing and brick and mortar is struggling as Amazon continues to take over the world. While we can’t deny the facts, we do think that there is a compelling case for new brands to create some sort of physical presence:

(1) It’s hard to be a big business without a physical presence

As evidenced by the recent troubles at JackThreads and Nasty Gal, e-commerce pure plays are very vulnerable. While each of these companies had their own unique problems, the attractiveness of the e-commerce model can only take a company so far. Compare JackThreads and Nasty Gal to Bonobos and Warby Parker. The latter two are both e-commerce darlings which have started focusing on creating physical showrooms. These showrooms don’t hold inventory, but they create a physical presence where customers can come in and experience the product. Warby Parker understood the importance of the physical experience from the beginning and created its home try-on program as a way to compensate for a lack of physical stores. JackThreads attempted to create a try-on program, but it was ultimately too little too late. Of course, there are some shining examples of success like Dollar Shave Club, but so far, these are the exception and not the rule.

(2) Most shopping is still done in person

We all know the stats. E-commerce is growing rapidly at a rate of 15-17% year over year. Yet, despite this incredible growth, e-commerce (excluding big ticket items like cars), still only represents 10% of retail sales. Of course, this is huge compared to just a few years ago and the growth rates speak for themselves. That being said, as a brand, you want to be where your customers are and at least 90% of their dollars are currently spent in store. It’s important to maintain your e-commerce business and prioritize it as the wave of the future, but completely ignoring the channel in which customers currently spend most of their dollars just isn’t smart business.

(3) As consumers shift spend from goods to experiences, a store can be a great way to create a compelling experience with your brand

If you think about some of the most successful retailers in the world, like Apple, the thing that makes them so successful is that the store is a unique experience that helps the customer connect with the brand. When you walk into Apple, you might not necessarily be looking to buy, but you certainly are looking to explore and discover new things.

Physical stores, by creating a branded experience, can have a similar impact for your business. They are a great place for customers to discover new products that they wouldn’t otherwise have seen or evaluate more expensive purchases, like jewelry. In many ways, the physical store can act like a marketing channel by putting your brand, products and the experience it stands for front and center with consumers.

(4) If you can’t afford your own stores or showrooms, take advantage of pop-ups

Several of our customers, including Aella, have been extremely successful with lower cost, temporary pop-up shops. The next one includes a partnership with several other brands and starts on March 1st. While pop-up shops are of course, temporary, they still create tremendous brand awareness in critical markets. The goal of these stores is ultimately to drive e-commerce traffic, so by being strategic about the location and timing, you can achieve that objective without committing to a full fledged store. 

Pop ups are great because in expensive markets like NYC, there are plenty of landlords who are receptive to the concept. Their rent is high, so finding a long-term tenant can be difficult. Thus, this leaves plenty of open space for your pop-up. 

(5) Being strategic about wholesale can have a similar impact as having your own showroom or pop up

Wholesale is a tough channel. Not only does it eat into margins, but it’s hard to control how your product is merchandised. That being said, picking a few strategic partners and specific locations that align with your brand can be tremendously helpful in reaching your ultimate objective: driving traffic back to your e-commerce site. 

However, the challenge really comes into play on the margin side. A lot of e-commerce companies have lower prices because they can - they can still have attractive margins by disintermediating the middle man. Many e-commerce companies pride themselves on replicating the Warby Parker model - finding inefficiencies in the supply chain which allow them to have lower prices than more established competitors. However, before setting your prices, brands need to keep in mind that price is an important indicator of quality to consumers. Further, if you want to maintain the flexibility to enter the wholesale channel, having slightly higher prices will create a bit of cushion for you on the margin side.

At Fuse, we're dedicated to supporting your business, whether it's an e-commerce pure play or a combination of e-commerce, retail and wholesale. We're here to help you focus on your business, not your inventory.