4 big inventory questions everyone is thinking about

Do you ever wonder, is anyone else thinking what I'm thinking?

Now that we’ve defined planning and provided some basic definitions to start with, it’s time to dig into the more difficult questions. We recently ran a product survey to ask our customers what questions were most important to you and have picked these four topics to expand on based on the results:

Data Anomalies

Data anomalies or outliers are non-recurring events like on-off promotions, PR pieces or stock-outs that may have impacted your sales history. Based on the results of our survey, this was by far and away the biggest concern for the majority of our customers with 40% of respondents citing this issue as their primary focus. 

The underlying reason for this is that data anomalies often go unnoticed in Excel spreadsheets, and when they are identified, their “weird” appearance relies on human memory to go back and analyze what happened. Was the dip in sales the result of a stock-out or poor performance? Was the spike in sales a result of a marketing promotion, or was it related to regular seasonality. Often, if the anomalies are identified, it requires a lot of digging through old emails to figure out exactly what happened in the data.

Fuse helps automate this process by scanning all of your data for anomalies (like big sales spikes or dips) so that none of these events go unaccounted for. Once we’ve identified anomalies, we smooth them out to create a more seamless forecast.

Marketing Data

We’ve written several times about the importance of making sure that marketing is closely aligned with the inventory planning team. Marketing directly impacts customer acquisition and revenue which in turn dictates the appropriate investment in inventory. 

In addition to ongoing marketing spend, promotions are important one-off events to note because they can drive significant spikes in demand, which, if not appropriately noted, can be confused with run of the mill seasonality. A big obstacle to noting these types of events is often a lack of information sharing between marketing and operations. While the marketing calendar might give marketing visibility, it’s sometimes not shared with or not checked by operations. In Fuse, you’ll soon be able to note marketing events like promos proactively in order to take these important initiatives into account in your forecast.

Cannibalization

Cannibalization is defined as the negative impact of a new product on the sales of existing products. While this is a concern for companies of all sizes, it can be particularly challenging for smaller companies that have a limited reach and audience. It can be unclear if launching a new product will expand the brand’s reach, encourage repeat purchasers or simply eat into existing products. Without sophisticated software, the cannibalization question can be hard to answer.

One simple starting point is attribute tagging which involves associating descriptive characteristics with each product. Attributes don’t have to be super complex - they can be things as basic as color. Although tedious to keep track of, if done properly, attribute tagging can allow the user compare how products with the same or similar attributes perform. More importantly, keeping a disciplined system of tags can help abstract away from the subjective elements of a product. 

Interestingly, at times, some of our customers have found that products that are seemingly in completely different categories cannibalize each other. However, when you take a closer look, there are often unexpected similarities on the underlying attribute level.

Procurement

Another big pain point (once the forecast is complete) is managing POs with suppliers so that the raw materials arrive in time for production. For any company that manufactures its own products, making sure that you don’t drop the ball on ordering all of the parts and components is critical. Between varying lead times, reliability, minimum order quantities and case pack sizes across suppliers, it can become a very painful and confusing optimization exercise. 

One way to mitigate the issues that can arise is to hire an industry veteran early on in your company’s history who has great relationships with the suppliers you need. As painful as this scheduling and optimization exercise can be, it’s even more painful if there are production disruptions caused by a company that’s much bigger than yours jumping ahead of you in line. The only real way to prevent this is to grow to become a bigger company (easier said than done), to have the right internal skills to diligence your suppliers appropriately or to have great relationships with your suppliers from prior experiences with them.

As we grow Fuse, we hope to be the primary resource that helps you solve these problems and more. We’re here to help you focus on your business, not your inventory.